Mail: qdnr@quinault.org   Phone: 1-360-276-8211 x7001

River Ecosystems

Quinault Opposes Chehalis Dam

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 16, 2020   For more information contact: *Tyson Johnston, Vice President, Quinault Indian Nation, Tjohnston@quinault.org Mark Glyde, Quinault Indian Nation Communications, (206) 227-4346, mrglyde@gmail.com *Please contact Mark Glyde to arrange an interview with Vice President Johnston   EXTINCTION IS NOT AN OPTION: QUINAULT NATION OPPOSES CHEHALIS DAM    Nation calls for credible alternative to reduce flood damage throughout the Chehalis Basin   Taholah, WA – The Quinault Indian Nation today announced its opposition to a proposed dam on the upper Chehalis River near the town of Pe Ell in Lewis County. The Nation’s opposition is...

Chehalis Basin Restoration Plan Critical

CHEHALIS BASIN RESTORATION PLAN CRITICAL FOR SPRING CHINOOK SAYS QUINAULT NATION Taholah, WA – The Washington State Office of Chehalis Basin today released for public comment the Phase 1 draft of the Aquatic Species Restoration Plan (ASRP) for the Chehalis Basin, the largest river system contained entirely within the state. The ASRP is being developed jointly by the state, the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, the Quinault Indian Nation and other interests in the Basin. “We appreciate the ambitious scale of the ASRP and the opportunity to join with our Basin neighbors to reverse decades of habitat degradation...

QIN Declares Drought Emergency on Reservation

Quinault Nation leaders have declared a drought emergency for the Quinault Indian Reservation as snow pack in the Olympic mountains has dwindled to zero percent of normal while total precipitation this year over the western Olympic Peninsula is the third lowest since 1895. The U.S. Drought Monitor on June 11 upgraded the drought classification for the Olympic Peninsula from “moderate” to “severe.” Drought conditions are expected to bring water shortages and restrictions as well as increased wildfire risk and hazards posing a threat to people, fish and wildlife. “The coming summer is likely to bring one of the worst...

Climate Change Effects the Pacific Northwest

Climate change effects — among them, increasing wildfires, disease outbreak and drought — are taking a toll on the Northwest, and what’s to come will threaten and transform our way of life from the salmon streams to ski slopes, according to a new federal climate assessment released Friday. The 1,000-plus-page report, produced by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, is the most comprehensive evaluation to date of climate change effects on the nation’s economy, human health, agriculture and environment. Thirteen federal agencies contributed to the report, which was required to be published by Congress. The federal report’s stark, direct...

Quinaults Can Regulate Water Quality

The Quinault Indian Nation can now regulate water quality on bodies of water within the reservation under a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action that provides the tribe with the same authority under the Clean Water Act as the state of Washington. The EPA last week approved a Quinault request to assume responsibilities of the Clean Water Act’s Water Quality Standards and Certification programs. “Specifically, this approval will enable the QIN to establish the regulatory and scientific foundation for protecting water quality by setting water quality goals and standards for the surface water bodies within the reservation,” the EPA...

State Must Replace Hundreds of Culverts to Save Salmon Habitats

In order to save Salmon habitats, Washington taxpayers face a bill of some $2.4 billion to repair hundreds of culverts over the next 11 years as a result of a U.S. Supreme Court decision Monday. Divided 4-4 with Justice Anthony Kennedy not participating, the tie lets stand a decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that the state was violating a series of tribal treaties with culverts that block salmon coming from and going to spawning grounds. Gov. Jay Inslee said the ruling brings “finality” to the long-running battle, and hopes various groups can work together to...

Forests are the Key to Freshwater Resources

Freshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but UBC researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much of an impact on global freshwater resources as climate change. UBC Okanagan Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences Professor Adam Wei, PhD candidate Qiang Li and researchers from the Chinese Academy of Forestry recently published a study examining the impacts of how changes in forest vegetation affect water supplies. Using several decades worth of data, their work examined how freshwater resources are responsive to vegetation ground cover and climate change. “As we urbanize land and...

Floods Necessary for Healthy River Ecosystems

Flooding rivers can wreak havoc on homes and roads but are necessary for healthy river ecosystems, research at Oregon State University suggests. The study shows that alterations to rivers’ natural flow patterns – because of dams, diversions and changes in precipitation – cause damage to riparian plant communities and river ecosystems in general. Even minor shifts in temporal flow patterns harm networks of competing vegetation, said the study’s corresponding author, Jonathan Tonkin of the OSU College of Science. The most severe effects, he said, occur when cyclical flooding is removed from the equation. “We think of floods as being...