Mail: qdnr@quinault.org   Phone: 1-360-276-8211 x7001

Resource Enforcement

Quinault Resource Enforcement Department

Quinault Resource Enforcement DepartmentIt is the mission of the Quinault Resource Enforcement Department to maintain enforcement patrols and other activities to help the Quinault Indian Nation protect its natural resources within its forests and fisheries in its Usual and Accustomed Areas and on Quinault Indian Nation Lands.

The Quinault Resource Enforcement Department is under the guidance of the Quinault Division of Natural Resources. The guiding document for the department is Title 61 (Natural Resource Management) of the Quinault Indian Nation code.

Quinault Resource Enforcement Department Programs:

  • Fisheries Enforcement – To provide enforcement patrols for all Quinault Indian Nation rivers, beaches, ocean fisheries, and surrounding rivers that are open for treaty fishing
  • Resource Enforcement – To provide enforcement patrols for regulated activities of forest harvest/activities and patrolling beaches for policy compliance
  • Wildlife Enforcement – To provide patrols for treaty regulated hunting on the Quinault Reservation and throughout the opened areas in our Usual and Accustomed area
  • Vessel Monitoring System – Responsible for maintaining the Electronic Vessel Monitoring systems that are required for Quinault Tribal fishing vessels participating in the Nation’s ocean fisheries

Services provided by the department include;

  • Enforcement of the Quinault Indian Nation code and tribal ordinances to protect life, culture and natural resources of the tribe.
  • Preservation of wildlife, environmental surroundings, cultural and archaeological sites and other natural resources of the Quinault Indian Nation.
  • Safeguard communities through awareness, education, and enforcement of tribal laws.
  • Collaboration with neighboring law enforcement agencies in a partnership of sharing information and training of officers.

Illegal Harvesting

Illegal harvesting is of the utmost importance to the tribe as it creates losses in revenue, irreversible damage to the natural resources, loss of cultural harvesting, and destroys the delicate ecosystem of the lands of the Quinault. Illegal harvesting can include a variety of items including trees, fish, shellfish, crabs, as well as many types of plant life.

An example of types of illegally harvested products include; decorative beargrass, evergreen boughs, pine cones, huckleberries, moss, wild flowers, cedar bark and so much more. These items often end up hundreds if not thousands of miles away being sold for floral arrangements, wreaths or made into baskets and medicines which go into the black market.

 

Natural Resource Enforcement Manager, Jared Eison  »  360.276.8215 x540

 

Additional Quinault Resource Enforcement Department Resources:

Quinault Vessel Monitoring Program

Quinault Wildlife Enforcement Program

National Fish & Wildlife Foundation

Washington State Department of Natural Resources

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Environmental Protection Online