Saturday, July 22, 2017

Traditional Ecological Knowledge

The Quinault Division of Natural Resources Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) Program is an

evolving body of knowledge, practice and belief that has been handed down through generations in Indian families and communities. It describes the relationship of living beings (human and non-human) with one another and the environment.

Traditional ecological knowledge is increasingly being sought by academics, agency scientists, and policymakers as a potential source of ideas for emerging models of ecosystem management, conservation biology, and ecological restoration. New directions in applied biology that have direct parallels and precedents in traditional knowledge include ecosystem management, medicine, pharmacology, agroecology, wildlife, fisheries, and animal behavior. This evolving knowledge has been acquired by indigenous and local peoples over hundreds or thousands of years through direct contact with the environment.

This knowledge that is specific to a location like the Quinault Indian Nation and includes the relationships between plants, animals, natural phenomena, landscapes, and timing of events that are used for lifetimes.

TEK particularly informs sustainable resource use. It may suggest solutions to problems such as over-harvesting of trees or fish as well as point to more sustainable practices in the future. In recent years, non-Indian scientists in academia, government and business have recognized the value of considering the worldview of indigenous people which includes ecology, spirituality, human and animal relationships, weather and more.

 

For more information on Traditional Ecological Knowledge please contact the following QDNR and QIN team members at 360.276.8215:

Cultural Resource Specialist, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. x7330

Museum Archivist/Curator, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. x245

Habitat Management Scientist, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. x240

Wetland Specialist, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. x7341

 

Helpful Information Links:

What is Traditional Ecological Knowledge? (Wikipedia)

Basic TEK Knowledge (US Fish and Wildlife Service)

The Importance of TEK When Examining Climate Change

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (National Park Service)

 

Clarence Pickernell

“This is my land
From the time of the first Moon till the time of the last Sun
It was given to my People
Wha-neh Wha-neh, the great giver of life, made me out of the Earth of this land
He said, ‘You are the land, and the land is you’
I take well care of this land, for I am part of it....”

-Clarence Pickernell, Taholah, WA

Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Quinault Division of Natural Resources Traditional Ecological Knowledge