Mail: qdnr@quinault.org   Phone: 1-360-276-8211 x7001

Pacific Northwest Salmon

Quinault Officials Skeptical of Chehalis River Dam

A month-long “scoping” period began Friday as state and federal regulators develop a framework for what will be examined in a pair of environmental impact statements on a proposal to build a dam to control flooding in the Chehalis River basin. Note: For more complete and recent information on the proposed dam please click HERE. The scoping process is to get public comment on the breadth of the environmental review. The Quinault Indian Nation immediately submitted a series of questions and concerns about the proposed Chehalis River dam, including how much it would cost, who will pay for it...

Governor Inslee Announces Agreement to Boost Salmon

Governor Inslee announced yesterday that representatives from the United States and Canada have agreed to recommend their governments approve new coast-wide fishing agreements under the Pacific Salmon Treaty. The agreement outlines each nation’s fishery management plans for Chinook, coho and chum stocks from 2019 to 2028. If approved, the treaty will result in more salmon returning to Washington and Oregon waters, where many populations are listed for protection under the federal Endangered Species Act. Governor Inslee Says This Step Comes at a Crucial Time “This step comes at a crucial time as we continue to see declines in Chinook...

State Must Replace Hundreds of Culverts to Save Salmon Habitats

In order to save Salmon habitats, Washington taxpayers face a bill of some $2.4 billion to repair hundreds of culverts over the next 11 years as a result of a U.S. Supreme Court decision Monday. Divided 4-4 with Justice Anthony Kennedy not participating, the tie lets stand a decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that the state was violating a series of tribal treaties with culverts that block salmon coming from and going to spawning grounds. Gov. Jay Inslee said the ruling brings “finality” to the long-running battle, and hopes various groups can work together to...

Salmon Fish Traps the Future?

Back in the 19th century, salmon fish traps brought in big hauls of Columbia River salmon. Retooled for the 21st century, could they be part of a more sustainable future for commercial harvests?  CATHLAMET, Wahkiakum County — More than eight decades after their demise, salmon fish traps are getting a fresh look from researchers convinced they offer a more sustainable way to catch Columbia River salmon. These traps are formed by nets attached to pilings that gently guide the fish into a kind of underwater corral. Wild fish protected under the federal Endangered Species Act can be released to...

Warm Waters off West Coast has Lingering Effects for Salmon

SEATTLE (AP) — The mass of warm water known as “the blob” that heated up the North Pacific Ocean has dissipated, but scientists are still seeing the lingering effects of those unusually warm sea surface temperatures on Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead. Federal research surveys this summer caught among the lowest numbers of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon in 20 years, suggesting that many fish did not survive their first months at sea. Scientists warn that salmon fisheries may face hard times in the next few years. Fisheries managers also worry about below average runs of steelhead returning to...

This is the Pacific Atlantic Salmon Not Wanted Here

The Quinault Indian Nation supports Governor Jay Inslee’s ban on new net pens until investigated and the establishment of an ‘incident command’ team of state agencies in the wake of the disastrous escape of thousands of Atlantic salmon near Cypress Island. However, the Tribe is making two demands: The focus of the effort must include the ocean and rivers that connect with the ocean, as well as Puget Sound; As co-managers of the salmon resource, affected tribal governments must be factored into and fully considered in any related decision making. “The problem is not excluded to Puget Sound alone....