Mail: qdnr@quinault.org   Phone: 1-360-276-8211 x7001

Quinault Endangered Species

Quinault Opposes Chehalis Dam

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 16, 2020   For more information contact: *Tyson Johnston, Vice President, Quinault Indian Nation, Tjohnston@quinault.org Mark Glyde, Quinault Indian Nation Communications, (206) 227-4346, mrglyde@gmail.com *Please contact Mark Glyde to arrange an interview with Vice President Johnston   EXTINCTION IS NOT AN OPTION: QUINAULT NATION OPPOSES CHEHALIS DAM    Nation calls for credible alternative to reduce flood damage throughout the Chehalis Basin   Taholah, WA – The Quinault Indian Nation today announced its opposition to a proposed dam on the upper Chehalis River near the town of Pe Ell in Lewis County. The Nation’s opposition is...

Study Points To Win-Win for Spotted Owls and Forest Management

Remote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of Washington. For 25 years, many forests in the western United States have been managed to protect habitat for endangered and threatened spotted owls. A central tenet of that management has been to promote and retain more than 70 percent of the forest canopy cover. However, dense levels of canopy cover leave forests prone to wildfires and can lead to...

Bill Introduced to Protect Grizzly Bears

WASHINGTON – To respond to the Department of the Interior’s controversial decision to remove endangered species protections for grizzly bear in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Ranking Member Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.) introduced the Tribal Heritage and Grizzly Bear Protection Act (H.R. 3894) at a press conference today surrounded by Tribal leaders and environmentalists. This bill would ensure that grizzly bears are permanently protected for their ecological and cultural value and guarantees Tribes have a role in conserving and managing the species. Grizzly bears are considered sacred by many Tribes, but today only a small fraction of the historic grizzly populations exist in the lower 48 states.   The...

WDFW Commission to Consider Listing Status of 8 Species at Meeting

  The WA Fish and Wildlife Commission will take action on the protective status of yellow-billed cuckoos, loggerhead sea turtles, fishers and five whale species at a public meeting Sept. 8-9 in Port Angeles. The commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), will convene both days at 8 a.m. at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St., in Port Angeles. A complete agenda is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/meetings.html. During the meeting, the WA Fish and Wildlife Commission will consider WDFW’s recommendation to list yellow-billed cuckoos as an endangered...