Mail: qdnr@quinault.org   Phone: 1-360-276-8211 x7001

Quinault Forestry

More Tree Health Issues Across the State

As the seasons change and the weather warms, DNR Forest Health staff tend to get more inquiries about tree health issues across the state. Some issues such as root diseases or Douglas-fir bark beetle mortality are relatively common, while others are less common but equally attention-getting. The latter includes red and dead branches, red and newly dead trees, and impacts on trees of various ages and sizes. A couple of issues in two of our most common tree species have emerged this year, including western hemlock defoliation and mortality, and tip dieback in Douglas-fir. You may have seen some...

Trees May Have a Heartbeat

It seems like every day we’re learning something new about how plants, trees and people aren’t so different. We’ve already told you about how plants can hear when they are being eaten, and how grass screams every time you cut it. Now, it turns out trees seem to have a heartbeat, and they don’t even have hearts. Trees Still, My Beating Heart There is a certain rhythm to life. Humans tend to wake up in the morning and go back to sleep at night based on a cycle we call a circadian rhythm. Other patterns, like your digestive cycle and the rhythm of...

Quinault To Host 42nd National Indian Timber Symposium

The Quinault Indian Nation is pleased to be hosting the 42nd Annual National Indian Timber Symposium in Ocean Shores, WA. The symposium will be held June 4-7, 2018 at the Ocean Shores Convention Center. The theme for the Symposium is “Forests: Our Heritage from the Past, Our Legacy to the Future“. The Monday Pre-Symposium Workshops, Conference, Registration and Monday Host Icebreaker will be held at the Ocean Shores Convention Center. The Tuesday Host Tribe Dinner, Wednesday General Membership Meeting and Thursday Annual Awards Banquet will be located at the Quinault Beach Resort and Casino. Quinault has a long-standing relationship...

3 Things You Didn’t Know Trees Did For You

Without trees and forests, life on Earth as we know it would be unthinkable. Most people know that forests are home to a wealth of biodiversity, that they provide water for billions of people and regulate the climate for everyone. But did you know that they can make you smarter? Or that, scientists think, they can drive rainfall? In honor of International Day of Forests, Human Nature looks into some of the benefits of forests that you might not know about. Trees Increase Property Values Selling your house? Consider planting some greenery. In 2007, economists who analyzed home sales in Portland, Ore., found that homes with...

Nanowood Decreases Carbon Footprint

Move over, Styrofoam, nanowood is here. Scientists have designed a heat-insulating material made from wood that is both light and strong and made entirely from tiny, stripped-down wood fibers. The so-called nanowood, described in the journal Science Advances, could one day be used to make more energy-efficient buildings. It’s cheap and biodegradable, too. “Nature is producing this kind of material,” said senior author Liangbing Hu, a materials scientist and engineer at the University of Maryland in College Park. Managing heat is a major issue in the cities we build. It’s hard to keep heat indoors in the winter and...

Forest Restoration: Getting the Prescription Right

Forest health, like human health, involves a complex set of variables. Just like medical doctors, there are many types of forest health specialists. Working together, silviculturists, fire specialists, hydrologists, biologists and timber specialists create comprehensive forest treatment and management plans. Forests face multiple health threats including disease, drought, fire and insect infestation. The way we manage our forests has short and long term impacts on a forest’s ability to respond to and resist these disturbances. This is similar to our own bodies: If we adopt healthy behaviors like getting enough sleep, exercising, and eating a balanced diet, we are...

Dead Trees Are Alive With Fungi

Fungi that live on trees perform an important function in the forest ecosystem by breaking down dead wood. This is no easy feat, because wood is very resilient. It is held together by a biopolymer known as lignin, which together with cellulose and hemicellulose form the cell wall of woody plants and give the wood its stability. Fungi are able to break down the robust lignin and the flexible cellulose fibres by releasing enzymes that cause the polymers to degrade and become mineralised. As part of the ecosystem’s cycle, the leftover material becomes part of the humus layer, which...

Forests are the Key to Freshwater Resources

Freshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but UBC researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much of an impact on global freshwater resources as climate change. UBC Okanagan Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences Professor Adam Wei, PhD candidate Qiang Li and researchers from the Chinese Academy of Forestry recently published a study examining the impacts of how changes in forest vegetation affect water supplies. Using several decades worth of data, their work examined how freshwater resources are responsive to vegetation ground cover and climate change. “As we urbanize land and...

National Forest Foundation – From Seed to Tree: How We Restore Forests

The National Forest Foundation receives generous donations from individuals, small businesses and corporations to support tree planting on our National Forests. We work closely with the U.S. Forest Service to complete these important projects. So what happens when a partner like Boxed Water gives us a call and says they’d like to plant 1 million trees over five years? Learn how we go from seeds to trees below. National Forest Foundation Project Each reforestation project has a specific purpose. Wildfire commonly creates a lot of reforestation need, particularly in the Western U.S.  Before beginning any part of the reforestation...