Mail: qdnr@quinault.org   Phone: 1-360-276-8211 x7001

River Ecosystems

Quinault Opposes Chehalis Dam

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 16, 2020   For more information contact: *Tyson Johnston, Vice President, Quinault Indian Nation, Tjohnston@quinault.org Mark Glyde, Quinault Indian Nation Communications, (206) 227-4346, mrglyde@gmail.com *Please contact Mark Glyde to arrange an interview with Vice President Johnston   EXTINCTION IS NOT AN OPTION: QUINAULT NATION OPPOSES CHEHALIS DAM    Nation calls for credible alternative to reduce flood damage throughout the Chehalis Basin   Taholah, WA – The Quinault Indian Nation today announced its opposition to a proposed dam on the upper Chehalis River near the town of Pe Ell in Lewis County. The Nation’s opposition is...

Quinaults Can Regulate Water Quality

The Quinault Indian Nation can now regulate water quality on bodies of water within the reservation under a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action that provides the tribe with the same authority under the Clean Water Act as the state of Washington. The EPA last week approved a Quinault request to assume responsibilities of the Clean Water Act’s Water Quality Standards and Certification programs. “Specifically, this approval will enable the QIN to establish the regulatory and scientific foundation for protecting water quality by setting water quality goals and standards for the surface water bodies within the reservation,” the EPA...

Quinault Officials Skeptical of Chehalis River Dam

A month-long “scoping” period began Friday as state and federal regulators develop a framework for what will be examined in a pair of environmental impact statements on a proposal to build a dam to control flooding in the Chehalis River basin. Note: For more complete and recent information on the proposed dam please click HERE. The scoping process is to get public comment on the breadth of the environmental review. The Quinault Indian Nation immediately submitted a series of questions and concerns about the proposed Chehalis River dam, including how much it would cost, who will pay for it...

Forests are the Key to Freshwater Resources

Freshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but UBC researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much of an impact on global freshwater resources as climate change. UBC Okanagan Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences Professor Adam Wei, PhD candidate Qiang Li and researchers from the Chinese Academy of Forestry recently published a study examining the impacts of how changes in forest vegetation affect water supplies. Using several decades worth of data, their work examined how freshwater resources are responsive to vegetation ground cover and climate change. “As we urbanize land and...

Floods Necessary for Healthy River Ecosystems

Flooding rivers can wreak havoc on homes and roads but are necessary for healthy river ecosystems, research at Oregon State University suggests. The study shows that alterations to rivers’ natural flow patterns – because of dams, diversions and changes in precipitation – cause damage to riparian plant communities and river ecosystems in general. Even minor shifts in temporal flow patterns harm networks of competing vegetation, said the study’s corresponding author, Jonathan Tonkin of the OSU College of Science. The most severe effects, he said, occur when cyclical flooding is removed from the equation. “We think of floods as being...